Posts Tagged ‘kevin gaines’

Why should I refinance?

Positive statements by the Federal Reserve Board regarding the pace of future hikes in interest rates and the release of weak employment data have served to bring rates down moving into the spring selling season. This unexpected move in rates give Americans a unique opportunity to save money through refinancing or making their new dream home more affordable. From mid-September of last year to early-April of this year, Freddie Mac has reported that average rates on a 30-year fixed loan have moved down slightly more than one-half of one percent. This amounts to a savings of more than $1,500 annually for a $300,000 mortgage and $45,000 over the life of the mortgage. Recently, Black Knight Financial Services found that, in light of recent interest rate decreases on home loans, 7.1 million Americans would currently benefit by refinancing. In addition, Zillow has reported that 5.2 million renters are planning to purchase a home in the next year. Sources: Freddie Mac, Zillow & HousingWire

Fifty-four percent of for-sale listings of existing homes are within reach for a median-income household in the U.S., according to a new analysis by realtor.com®. Their analysts used the national median income of $51,801 to determine how many of the site’s 1.6 million listings would be affordable to an average family, while also assuming a 20 percent down payment and 30-year fixed-rate mortgage. The monthly payment couldn’t exceed 28 percent of the family’s income. “So far this year we are hearing from home shoppers that finding a home that meets their needs or budget is the biggest impediment to buying,” says Jonathan Smoke, realtor.com®’s chief economist. “The good news from this data is that more than half of the listings nationwide are by definition affordable.” Realtor.com® analysts also found that existing homes tended to be much more affordable than new homes. In February, realtor.com® had more than 7,700 actively selling new-home communities listed, with an inventory of nearly 57,000 homes available for sale. Only 21 percent of those new homes, however, were deemed affordable. Source: realtor.com®

As Millennials begin to enter the homebuying market in larger numbers, homes will get a little smaller, laundry rooms will be essential, and home technology will become increasingly prevalent, said panelists during an International Builders’ Show press conference on home trends and Millennials’ home preferences. NAHB Assistant Vice President of Research Rose Quint predicted that the growing numbers of first-time homebuyers will drive down home size in 2015. Three million new jobs were created in 2014, 700,000 more than the previous year “and the most since 1999,” Quint said. At the same time, regulators have reduced downpayment requirements for first-time homebuyers from five percent to three percent and home prices have seen only moderate growth. “All these events lead me to believe that more people will come into the market, and as younger, first-time buyers, they will demand smaller, more affordable homes,” Quint said. “Builders will build whatever demand calls out for.” Of the Top 10 features mentioned by home builders, four have to do with energy efficiency: Low-E windows, Energy Star-rated appliances and windows and programmable thermostats. The top features: a master bedroom walk-in closet and a separate laundry room.

Source: National Mortgage Professional

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Real Estate News

Builder confidence in the new-home market rose to its highest reading in nearly 9 years, according to the latest reading from the National Association of Home Builders/Wells Fargo Housing Market Index. September marked the fourth consecutive month that builder confidence has been on the rise. “Since early summer, builders in many markets across the nation have been reporting that buyer interest and traffic have picked up, which is a positive sign that the housing market is moving in the right direction,” says NAHB Chairman Kevin Kelly. For the new-home market, builder confidence rose to a level of 59 in September, according to the index. Any reading above 50 indicates that more builders view conditions as “good” than “poor.” The seasonally adjusted index measures builder perceptions of the single-family new-home market on home sales and sales expectations for the next six months, as well as builders’ perceptions of buyer traffic. All three of the index components in September posted gains, with current sales conditions and traffic of prospective buyers rising to 63 and 47, respectively. Expectations for future sales also rose two points to 67. Source: National Association of Home Builders

Some home buyers are making an unusual request: They’re asking to spend the night at a home before they make an offer on it. HGTV’s “Sleep On It,” which follows potential buyers as they stay overnight in two homes with the sellers’ approval before deciding which one to buy, hasn’t seemed to spark a national trend. But it has prompted such proposals to surface more often, real estate professionals say. The sleep-overs can help buyers gain a better perspective on what it actually would feel like to live at the home, whether the kitchen is the right size, the noisy neighbors are too distracting, or the water pressure just isn’t right. Corlie Ohl, a real estate professional at Citi Habitats in New York City, recalls a client who requested to take a shower in an $865,000 apartment he was considering purchasing. He wanted to make sure the place had adequate water pressure. “It’s the strangest request I’ve ever experienced in my life for someone who wanted to purchase an apartment,” Ohl says. “The seller said, ‘Yeah, I guess, as long as he brings his own towel.” Contracts are a good idea for any buyer sleep-overs to protect both parties from liabilities, such as loss of personal belongings, say real estate professionals. A couple in Boulder, Colo., were staying at a condo when they decided to check out the condo’s parking area at night. But, “as they exited the elevator, they were abruptly confronted by two police officers, weapons drawn,” says real estate professional Bob Gordon. The neighbors had thought they were burglars. But the incident prompted the couple to put in an offer immediately on the home, “knowing the neighbors would be concerned enough to call police,” Gordon says.
Source: US News and World Report

15 Things Highly Confident People Don’t Do

Old Republic Home Protection (ORHP) - In Touch Newsletter

15 Things Highly Confident People Don’t Do15 Things Highly Confident People Don’t Do
By Daniel Wallen

Highly confident people believe in their ability to achieve. If you don’t believe in yourself, why should anyone else put their faith in you? To walk with swagger and improve your self-confidence, watch out for these fifteen things highly confident people don’t do.

1. They don’t make excuses.

Highly confident people take ownership of their thoughts and actions. They don’t blame the traffic for being tardy for work; they were late. They don’t excuse their short-comings with excuses, such as “I don’t have the time” or “I’m just not good enough”; they make the time and they keep on improving until they are good enough.

2. They don’t avoid doing the scary thing.

Highly confident people don’t let fear dominate their lives. They know that the things they are afraid of doing are often the very same things that they need to do in order to evolve into the person they are meant to be.

3. They don’t live in a bubble of comfort.

Highly confident people avoid the comfort zone because they know this is a place where dreams die. They actively pursue a feeling of discomfort because they know stretching themselves is mandatory for their success.

4. They don’t put things off until next week.

Highly confident people know that a good plan executed today is better than a great plan executed someday. They don’t wait for the “right time” or the “right circumstances,” because they know these reactions are based on a fear of change. They take action here, now, today—because that’s where progress happens.

5. They don’t obsess over the opinions of others.

Highly confident people don’t get caught up in negative feedback. While they do care about the well-being of others and aim to make a positive impact in the world, they don’t get caught up in negative opinions that they can’t do anything about. They know that their true friends will accept them as they are, and they don’t concern themselves with the rest.

6. They don’t judge people.

Highly confident people have no tolerance for unnecessary, self-inflicted drama. They don’t feel the need to insult friends behind their backs, participate in gossip about fellow co-workers, or lash out at folks with different opinions. They are so comfortable in who they are that they feel no need to look down on other people.

7. They don’t let lack of resources stop them.

Highly confident people can make use of whatever resources they have, no matter how big or small. They know that all things are possible with creativity and a refusal to quit. They don’t agonize over setbacks, but rather focus on finding a solution.

8. They don’t make comparisons.

Highly confident people know that they are not competing with any other person. They compete with no other individual except the person they were yesterday. They know that every person is living a story so unique that drawing comparisons would be an absurd and simplistic exercise in futility.

9. They don’t find joy in people-pleasing.

Highly confident people have no interest in pleasing every person they meet. They are aware that not all people get along, and that’s just how life works. They focus on the quality of their relationships, instead of the quantity of them.

10. They don’t need constant reassurance.

Highly confident people aren’t in need of hand-holding. They know that life isn’t fair and things won’t always go their way. While they can’t control every event in their lives, they focus on their power to react in a positive way that moves them forward.

11. They don’t avoid life’s inconvenient truths.

Highly confident people confront life’s issues at the root before the disease can spread any farther. They know that problems left unaddressed have a way of multiplying as the days, weeks, and months go by. They would rather have an uncomfortable conversation with their partner today than sweep an inconvenient truth under the rug, putting trust at risk.

12. They don’t quit because of minor set-backs.

Highly confident people get back up every time they fall down. They know that failure is an unavoidable part of the growth process. They are like detectives, searching for clues that reveal why this approach didn’t work. After modifying their plan, they try again (but better this time).

13. They don’t require anyone’s permission to act.

Highly confident people take action without hesitation. Every day, they remind themselves, “If not me, who?”

14. They don’t limit themselves to a small toolbox.

Highly confident people don’t limit themselves to plan A. They make use of any and all weapons at their disposal, relentlessly testing the effectiveness of every approach until they identify the strategies that offer the most results for the least cost in time and effort.

15. They don’t blindly accept what they read as “truth” without thinking about it.

Highly confident people don’t accept articles on the Internet as truth just because some author “said so.” They look at every how-to article from the lens of their unique perspective. They maintain a healthy skepticism, making use of any material that is relevant to their lives and forgetting about the rest. While articles like this are a fun and interesting thought-exercise, highly confident people know that they are the only person with the power to decide what “confidence” means.

Daniel Wallen is the CEO (Chief Empowerment Officer) of the Wallen Way. He is a personal trainer, Lifehack contributor, and author of The Busy Woman’s Guide to Getting Fit, Fierce, and Fabulous. Click here to access his e-mail course, the Mind + Body Make-Over.

ATTENTION ALL SELLERS:

Has your home been for sale longer than 90 days? No showings? Well, today The G Team is bringing you the Top 5 Turn-Off’s for home buyers!!

1. Overpricing for the market. Remember your Realtor is going to give you the best advice on your markets current conditions, not your cousin’s sister in law’s husband twice removed that used to be a Realtor is Idaho in the 80’s. We PROMISE to give you the FACTS on our local real estate market!

2. Smells. No one wants to hear that their home is “smelly” but stink happens. Whether it’s from pets, smoke, water damage, or simply the lack of cleanliness smells happen to the best of us. No buyer wants to buy a home that smells. Our advice: identify the smell and remove the issue.

3. Clutter. When a buyer enters a prospective home you (the seller) want them to envision the home as their new home. If the first thing the buyer notices upon entering your home is stacks of papers and figurines full to the edges on all tables then the buyer’s attention goes to try to avoid knocking anything over instead of visually touring the home. Which brings us to furniture, too much furniture confuses the eye and makes it difficult for buyers to see the true sizes of a room.

4.Deferred maintenance. Just like people wear out, houses do too. As a homeowner, it is your responsibility to maintain your home. Buyers want a well maintained home, not a money pit. We’ve all heard the horror stories!

5. Dated decor. Buyers are looking at your home instead of buying new construction because of two things: cost and location. They may love your neighborhood but that doesn’t mean they’re willing to sacrifice modern amenities. Examples of items that can ‘date’ your home: popcorn ceilings, wallpaper, pepto bismol pink bathrooms, colors from 70’s & 80’s (i.e. harvest gold, avocado, soft blues and mauves) are just a few examples.

Call your local real estate experts, The G Team for all of your real estate needs! We can evaluate your home before putting it on the market, help you with buying your first home or your dream home or even manage property for you! Call us today at 615-466-3030.

Simple Tips on Selling your Home

1. Less is more. Get rid of any unnecessary items. You want potential buyers to view themselves living in your home not like they are invading your space. Consider taking down personal family photos or hiding highly personal taste. 

2. Make your rooms roomier. Something as simple as changing the position of your furniture can change the whole feel of a room. Another idea would be to repaint using a color that brightens up the space making it appear larger. 

3. Go Neutral. Not all potential buyers can see past that adorable magenta & lime green polka dot colored bedroom your 6 year old daughter insisted she must have. Before putting your house on the market consider painting walls a beige, white, or grey hue.

4. Make a great 1st impression. Curb appeal is the first place a homeowner can show off their home..make sure the outside of your home is saying the right things. Take a weekend to trim your bushes, paint the front door or shutters, replace light fixtures, or even plant some flowers. The old saying “You never have a second chance to make a first impression” really applies here. 

5. Revamp the backyard. Add an outdoor table set, lawn ornaments, plants to add some character to the backyard. You want buyers to envision being able to utilize every space in your home. 

6. Re-purpose the “junk room”.  Do you have a room that is dedicated to projects you hope to get to one day? Take the time to clear out this space and show other possibilities for the space. It could be an office, work out room, media room or even a spare bedroom. 

7. Update the kitchen. There are several things you can do to update your kitchen without spending thousands (i.e. new faucet set, updated light fixtures, new cabinet door handles, re-paint the cabinets..)

8. Accessorize the bathroom. Spruce up the bathroom with a new shower curtain, a nice towel set, new rugs to add a pop of color or even a new toilet seat! 

9. Presentation really is EVERYTHING. Be sure to empty the trash regularly, use light air fresheners throughout the house (be considerate in choosing a fragrance), add a welcome mat and even deep clean the carpets.